In Washington area, African American students suspended and expelled two to five times as often as whites

The Washington Post

By Donna St. George, Published: December 28

Student suspension rates

African American students have higher suspension rates in area schools than other groups ­­— especially in the District and some Maryland counties. For example, 12 out of every 100 African American students in the District’s charter schools were suspended. Read related article.

Student suspension rates
Sources: State education agencies, Washington Post analysis. The Washington Post.

Across the Washington area, black students are suspended and expelled two to five times as often as white students, creating disparities in discipline that experts say reflect a growing national problem.

An analysis by The Washington Post shows the phenomenon both in the suburbs and in the city, from the far reaches of Southern Maryland to the subdivisions of FairfaxPrince George’s and Montgomery counties.

Last year, for example, one in seven black students in St. Mary’s County were suspended from school, compared with one in 20 white students. In Alexandria, black students were nearly six times as likely to be suspended as their white peers.

Column | Black boys: We see them differently )

In Fairfax, where the suicide in January of a white high school football player who had been suspended brought an outcry for change, African American students were four times as likely that year to be suspended as white students, and Hispanic students were twice as likely.

The problems extend beyond the Washington area to school districts across the country and are among a host of concerns about school discipline that sparked a joint effort by the U.S. Justice and Education departments in July to look into reforms.

Experts say disparities appear to have complex causes. A disproportionate number of black students live below the poverty line or with a single parent, factors that affect disciplinary patterns. But experts say those factors do not fully explain racial differences in suspensions. Other contributing factors could include unintended bias, unequal access to highly effective teachers and differences in school leadership styles.

In the Washington region, many school leaders said they are increasingly focused on the problem and grappling with ways to close the gap.

In Montgomery, Deputy Superintendent Frieda K. Lacey said the district has trained principals and administrators in new approaches, which include involving a team of administrators in suspension decisions.

Still, she said, much remains to be done. Nearly 6 percent of black students were suspended or expelled from school last year, compared with 1.2 percent of white students. The gap remains even as suspensions are down since 2006 across all racial groups.

She pointed to one unsettling statistic: 71 percent of suspensions for insubordination, a relatively rare offense in the county, were handed out to black students. African Americans make up 21 percent of students in Montgomery’s schools. The goal is to dig deeper into the data, offer more professional development and share best practices, she said. “We don’t try to minimize the data,” Lacey said. “We just try to talk about it the way it exists.”

The Post’s analysis found that in the Washington suburbs alone, more than 35,000 students were suspended or expelled from school at some point last school year — more than half of them black students.

In interviews, many school officials noted successes in reducing overall suspensions during the past several years and cited cultural-sensitivity training and positive-behavior initiatives that are more proactive about discipline.

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This entry was posted in achievement gap, Education, Race by Ariana Rosas. Bookmark the permalink.

About Ariana Rosas

Ariana is originally from Mexico, but spent the last 12 years in Los Angeles attending school, participating in grassroots organizing and working with workers and youth at various capacities. She recently moved to New York to attend the Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy in hopes of better serving working-poor families and communities.

3 thoughts on “In Washington area, African American students suspended and expelled two to five times as often as whites

  1. Pingback: Black Boys, Seen Differently « Uzima Community Blog

  2. Pingback: White Kids in Florida Do So Many More Drugs Than Minorities, According to DCF Survey «

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